Tag Archives: New York City

REA APPROVED! Excursion

Today our staff was sent out in pairs to discover the things we normally ignore during our hectic New York City lives.  The city is filled with wonders large and small that we miss on our rushed way to work.  This was a chance for us to walk aimlessly to search for the beautiful things the city has to offer–focusing on design, architecture, and street art.

The staff brought back a lot of photos in a mere hour’s time, so we’ll post them bit by bit.  Check out our REA APPROVED blog for Part I.

Do you have any suggestions of places in the city where we can find some inspirational street art work?

Carsten Höller’s “Experience” at the New Museum

A review by Lecia Bushak, REA Intern

The New Museum’s Carsten Höller exhibition, Experience, is “the first New York survey” of his works.  Höller has been creating artworks for the past 20 years, after abandoning his scientific career to pursue that of an artist.  The New Museum brings together a variety of Höller’s installations, sculptures, test sites, and drawings, transforming all 4 floors of the museum space into a participatory laboratory, in which viewers are encouraged to interact with the works—including a giant slide penetrating several floors, a mirrored carousel, and a sensory deprivation pool.

Höller does not intend his work to merely be viewed; rather he designs it to be experienced (hence the title of the show) and “explores the limits of human sensorial perception and logic” (New Museum).  However, despite the superficially imaginative qualities of the pieces, the experience of the viewer is controlled in an almost scientific-experimental way, not leaving much room for interpretation.  It seems like the viewers are lab rats in one of Höller’s larger scientific experiments, in which he interprets our actions as responses to his stimuli.

Upon entering the museum on the first floor, if wishing to participate, viewers must sign a waiver and are offered upside-down goggles, which immediately presents the exhibition as a sort of playground or funhouse with its own museum-imposed rules and regulations.  Although safety is certainly an issue (the day I went, it was also children’s day, which meant the slide and other interactive pieces were swarmed with kids), it immediately renders the exhibition as a regulated, controlled, and limited so-called “experience.”

The most visually effective piece is the mirrored carousel.  Silent and slow moving to the point of being imperceptible, yet illuminated and glowing, it is a bizarre counterpart to a familiar carousel.  Participants sit with comatose expressions, waiting for their seats to move ever so slowly; they become part of the spectacle.  It is paired with “Singing Canaries Mobile,” a structure of cages filled with chirping birds, which is hung from the ceiling and also moving slowly.  The two pieces provide the viewer with a strange and potentially nauseating, but also hypnotic, visual motion.

Although the museum organized the show thematically floor by floor (i.e. the 4th floor focuses on movement, 3rd floor on utopian architectural spaces, 2nd floor on self-experimentation and confusion of senses), it is still rather disjointed.  I found the architectural structures such as the carousel, the slide, and the giant psycho tank to be more connected and effective together than the 2nd floor’s assaulting flashing lights paired with the low-lying, neon-colored creature sculptures, which leave the viewer in an overall state of annoyed confusion.  But perhaps that’s what the artist intended.

Strange colorful sculptures, although interesting pieces on their own, seemed out of place amidst the Dan Flavin-esque flashing lights.

Perhaps this idea of controlled experimentation on the viewers’ senses considers the way society itself controls much of our experiences.  Even the way we move—through buildings, on the street, up and down stairs, is controlled by social standards and norms, architectural infrastructures and human designs—similarly, Höller and the New Museum control the way we travel down the slide.  The slide then controls what turns our body makes and how fast it goes.  Beyond that, the way we move and interact with things is influenced by our own vision—and perhaps by giving us upside-down goggles, flipping the world over, Höller gives us a chance to escape our own limits (albeit in a controlled way, and in the limited setting of a ‘playground’ or constructed ‘funhouse.’)

The New Museum states: “Taken as a whole, Höller’s work is an invitation to re-imagine the way in which we move through the world and the relationships we build as he asks us to reconsider what we think we know about ourselves.”  For me, a true artistic experience is one that is not a cushioned playground or “testing” site, but the real thing, released into the wild.  This ideal raw experience would have no rules or safety helmets to buffer our risk of panic when presented with disorder and disruptive sensations.

FAO Schwarz

About the location: Central Park, Fifth Avenue Fashion, spectacular art, thriving culture, endless shopping, unbelievable dining and lively nightlife – this is Pure New York City. Amid the whirl of excitement you will find the GM Building, and located at its base the legendary FAO Schwarz store, a timeless beloved destination loved by adults and children alike.  

How REA approached the design & video process: Our challenge was to create a customizable campaign that targeted individual world-class retailers, giving them the ability to envision their brands in the space. While touring the location, we noticed how the FAO Schwarz building exterior mimicked a showcase from the outside—like something you might find in a fine jewelry store. We also discovered that the location was truly unparalleled and a brand would be showcased here like no other. Thus the idea of “the perfect showcase” was born.

Milford Hotel

What REA produced: Video, website, email campaign.

About the retail location:  The Milford retail provides two retail spaces that can be divided – the first with three levels on 44th St; the second with the ground floor on 45th Street.  Every year, $4.9B is spent in Times Square – nearly half of which is retail spending.  This is no surprise, seeing as shoppers and tourists flock to Times Square as the ideal location to find the biggest and the best stores in New York City.

51K people pass by the Milford every day.  The Milford is located in the heart of the Theater District, near restaurant row and the Port Authority Bus Terminal, surrounded by NYC gems like Madison Square Garden, MoMA, Carnegie Hall, the Garment District, and Central Park.

The 1,300-room Milford Hotel itself was once the largest hotel in NYC when it opened in 1928, and remains one of the biggest and most well-known in the city today.

How REA approached the design & video process:  Our design process began simply by standing on the shoulders of the Hotel’s new brand identity.  We then came up with the idea of having each floor convey a different NYC neighborhood.  We infused this youthful and curious energy into the website design and short film we produced.

589 Fifth Avenue

What REA produced: Branding, video, brochure and packaging.

About the retail location: 589 Fifth Avenue is located on the premier southeast corner of Fifth Ave and 48th St. Fifth Avenue is the most prominent stage for retail in New York City – with several hundred thousand shoppers and tourists buying and browsing on a daily basis.

The sheer amount of foot traffic that Fifth Avenue attracts provides countless opportunities for potential customers to see and experience this location.  Fifth Ave is already the stage for the biggest names in retail, including Saks Fifth Avenue, Abercrombie & Fitch, H&M, Aldo, Urban Outfitters, etc.  This is a chance to build a must-see store that is more than just retail—it’s a destination on the world’s most desired avenue.

How REA approached the design & video process: Our approach was a combination of two strong ideas. The first was to encompass the power of Fifth Avenue and its worldwide appeal, which we expressed by “putting you brand center stage.”  The second was to introduce “TH!NK” and challenge potential tenants to consider all the location manifests and provides. The result was a fast-paced, heart-pounding journey into the power of 589 Fifth Avenue.

Real Estate Arts HAS AN APP FOR THAT!

Here is a press release REA recently sent out, about a new online application we’re developing for the iPad.  What do you think?

Real Estate Arts showcases offering memorandum on the Ipad

taking the "OM" digital

New York, NY, November 4, 2011 — Real Estate Arts Inc, a leading real estate-focused branding and marketing agency based in New York, announced today its commitment to revolutionizing the way commercial property asset and investment sales are marketed.

Real Estate Arts (REA) is well known in the commercial real estate investment sales community for transforming the standard Offering Memorandum package from one of a simple pictorial word document to a fully-branded and highly-designed showcase marketing tool. REA’s work has won numerous awards for its innovative design, but more importantly has helped brokers and owners of the most prestigious properties command the highest prices per square foot in many markets across the US.

REA President Michael Goodgold said, “As the investment sales market comes back, many of our clients are again looking to us to improve the sales and marketing process. The introduction of tablets and especially the iPAD has given marketers like us a real reason to get excited.”

Technology takes the lead in REA’s innovative marketing approach, which allows potential acquirers to experience the property’s assets through the use of an online application.  The tablet opens up new possibilities for the disposition process, blending different types of technology, ranging from video and mapping to interactive informational graphics.  Unlike the foregone era, in which prospective buyers learned about properties only through static printed pages, the tablet provides a dynamic experience, with information that can be constantly updated.  Furthermore, it organizes all property information in one place, so buyers don’t have to jump from various sources—print brochures, websites, or booklets to accomplish their goals.

For the past 15 years, Real Estate Arts has helped owners and their brokers sell some of the most prestigious properties around the world—from luxury hotels and resorts to Class A Office towers and multifamily properties.  Goodgold added that REA continues to work with some of the smartest technology minds that have helped develop name brand applications that most people experience daily.

“From a user standpoint our focus is squarely on the experience of the acquisition professional,” he said.  “Those men and women are constantly looking at deals and want a tool where they can manage the entire process from one easy place.”

Meet artist Gwyneth Leech

REA stumbled upon the artwork of Gwyneth Leech in the Flatiron building, where she creates beautiful drawings on paper coffee cups and hangs them from the ceiling.  We were so impressed and inspired by her work, that we decided to shoot a quick film and interview her for our “REA APPROVED” blog.  Check out the video here.