Tag Archives: interior design

One Man’s Firehouse Is Another Man’s Home

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NYC’s Limelight Marketplace – a former church and nightclub.

These days it’s expected for things to take on a second life in a different form – we live in the age of recycling and the decade of hipsters, after all. From retro wardrobes to trash art to antiquing and composting, our society (for the most part) simply likes to transform old into new. Similarly, reconditioning buildings – particularly in NYC – is a practice we’ve made popular. Why? Because we love relics. They emanate history, character and rarity, which is why we’re willing to pay a lot to live in one. Developers have caught on; today they leverage old properties by converting the likes of churches, stables, firehouses and police station radio rooms into modern-day dwellings. They turn distinct spaces into camouflaged homes, unbeknownst to many of their repurposed function. Luckily for us, their opting for interior reconfiguration over tearing down a building preserves the neighborhood’s appearance and personality for later generations to appreciate.

ImageInterior of Limelight Marketplace

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A former stable (Photo: New York Magazine)

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A former church (Photo: New York Magazine)

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A former firehouse (Photo: New York Magazine)

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A former police station radio room (Photo: New York Magazine)

– Francisca Ovalle, Copywriter

A Home Away From My Home

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I’ve always had an appreciation for interior design; I think it stemmed from habitually driving by expensive homes at night with my mom to see the full monty of their décor. I won’t even get started on our frequent trips to open houses, but I will say it contributed to my love of studying where people live (bless The Selby and it’s bi-weekly dose of habitat profiles).

Fortunately for me, there’s a beautiful home 30 minutes away I can visit and admire as often as I want without seeming creepy. Just over in Corona, Queens, Louis Armstrong’s three-story brick house serves as a time capsule from the 28 years he lived there with his wife Lucille. Today a museum, the surprisingly modest building acts as a relic, quintessential of the leading styles from 1960s design. Guests are invited to take a guided tour, listen to at-home recordings of Louis talking and singing, and gaze at his artifacts on display (i.e. a trumpet, photos, clothing and manuscripts). I’ve now visited the landmark three times, and on each trip noticed another detail or learned something new. If I can’t convince you to also stop by, maybe these photos will.

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– Francisca Ovalle, Copywriter