Tag Archives: Art

Tipping my Fedora to the Mad Men of Old.

Here’s a re-post from our REA Approved Blog! We thought it’d be worth it to share it here too:

4/6 – It’s hard to escape the frenzy of the new season of Mad Men. The captivating ads are plastered everywhere; the talk around the water cooler about the future of Don Draper is plentiful.  Not to mention retailers like Banana Republic are jumping on the band wagon by showcasing Mad Men inspired fashions in their windows. I have to say, I love it all. The visual style is breathtaking and inspiring and seems to be showing up on my radar everywhere I go.

A few weeks ago I attended a field trip with my son Andrew to the New York Transit Museum in Brooklyn, which ended up being another unexpected time warp back to the 1960′s. The tour of the old subway cars was interesting in itself, but when I looked up to see pristine ads from the period, I was in heaven.  From the 2012 Madmen to those of the 1960′s: I say thank you. You have left an undeniable mark on the advertising business, and a visual style to be cherished, studied and re-examined. -M.G.

Magazine Cover Designs for Inspiration…

 

Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter is considered one of the 21st century’s modern masters of painting.  He is talented in technical skills, as seen in his photo-realist portraits, but in his later years has worked mainly in abstraction.  Either way, his work seems to drift out of the subconscious, as his soft, blurred painting technique evokes a beautiful dreamlike quality.

Woman Descending the Staircase, 1965

Betty, 1988

Betty, 1977

One of Richter’s specialties was portraits.  The two above are of his daughter, Betty.

Richter used this type of “Atlas,” or plan, before painting.  Working straight from photographs, he would collect and place them together on sheets as source material for his paintings.

Self Portrait, 1996

Seascape, 1975

Richter also painted landscapes — clouds, seas, forests, meadows.  Unlike traditional landscape paintings, Richter’s border on the abstract.  Visually they seem to be the bridge between his photo-realist works and his more removed, abstract paintings.

Seascape, 1969

 

Untitled (Green), 1971

Abstract Painting, 1977

Untitled

In his later years, Richter — who had always worked closely with photographs — began to use them directly in his work.  Instead of painting from them, he began painting on them.  They are a collision of two forces — the real and the abstract of pure color.

Abstract Painting, 1995

Architect Bits

REA has come across a few interesting architects who integrate fine art and design into large-scale, experimental installations.  Enjoy the images and links below.

John Locke is an architect living in New York City.  Below, you’ll see the mirrored fence he built around the World Trade Center site to emphasize the shape of the sky in between buildings.  Sometimes, it’s the negative space hugging the angles of buildings that is quite beautiful in itself.

Locke also built bookshelves to incorporate into NYC phone booths, redefining the use for phone boots in a cell phone age.  The bookshelves invite people to take a book for free, or leave one for others to find.  This is perhaps the most public a “public library” could possibly be.

Ball-Nogues Studio is an architecture firm started by two friends, Benjamin Ball and Gaston Nogues.  They “explore the nexus of art, architecture, and industrial design” and have exhibited their work in various art museums around the world, including MoMA, the Guggenheim, and PS1.

RO&AD Architects are another duo — Ad Kil and Ro Koster — who came up with the “Moses Bridge.”  It quite literally parts the water of a moat for a fort in the Netherlands, called Fort de Roovere.  The fort is part of a defense-line that includes other fortresses and cities dating from the 17th century.  Drawing on the area’s historical context, RO&AD decided it was best to create a bridge that would be invisible to enemies trying to cross the moat.

Marina Abramovic: Life as Art

By Jess Wertheim, REA Intern

Is there a difference between life and art?  The famed performance artist Marina Abramović doesn’t think so.  For her, “performance becomes life itself…performance becomes life and life becomes art.”  A good friend of hers once said, “Marina is never not performing.”

Both daring and extreme, Marina Abramović pushes boundaries in the most surprising ways possible.  She risks her life on a regular basis, all in the name of art.  Everything she does provokes deep inner emotions in others as they watch and/or interact with her.  So much so that people question how what she does is art?

Her exhibit back in 2010 at the Museum of Modern Art titled The Artist Is Present was unlike anything I had ever seen before.  Upon entering the exhibit there were photographs hanging on the walls with descriptions of the performances while some projectors hung from the ceiling, playing other performances of hers in a loop.  For example, one video showed the artist lying on the ground, screaming.  The description read, “The artist screamed until she lost her voice.”  In another video, she violently brushes her hair while making frustrated, angry sounds.  In one piece called “Rest Energy”, she and her lover faced one another and held a large bow and arrow together. While she held the bow, he pulled the string backwards, aiming the arrow toward her heart.

For a piece that she did in 1973 titled “Rhythm 10” she played music from a tape recorder while one hand was spread open on the floor.  She took a knife in her other hand and to the rhythm of the music stabbed at the spaces in between her fingers and changed to a bigger knife each time she stabbed herself.  Many of her works were disturbing such as this one.

There were also two live aspects to the exhibit.  One was the naked man and woman standing in the entranceway of the gallery that led into the next gallery.  In order to proceed, it was necessary for one to pass through them, and most likely rub against them due to the small space.

The main attraction was of course, Ms. Abramović herself.  She sat at a small wooden table in the lobby of the museum across from an empty seat.  One at a time people were encouraged to take a seat across from her and sit silently without talking, touching or any explicit communication.  Her goal was “to achieve a luminous state of being and then transmit it—to engage in what she calls ‘an energy dialogue’ with the audience.” She did this all day, every day until the exhibit closed.  Appropriately called The Artist Is Present, the piece was the “longest-duration solo work of [her] career, and by far the most physically and emotionally demanding she [had] ever attempted.”  Art critic Arthur Danto observed The Artist Is Present exemplifies a completely new experience in the history of art.  “For most masterpieces people stand in front of it for thirty seconds. Mona Lisa: Thirty seconds. But people come and sit here all day.”  This performance demonstrated Ms. Abramović’s statement about long-durational work might be true after all: “Performance becomes life itself.”

Inspiration and Advice from Sol LeWitt

Detailed, painstaking, strangely liberating.  These terms have often been used to describe Sol LeWitt’s large drawings and paintings that span entire walls in some of the most well-known museums in the world.  LeWitt came up with the concept behind the work, then employed hundreds of working artists, art students and art historians to execute them–allowing his works to be subject to new and unexpected changes throughout the process.

In this way, “each instantiation, each iteration, is a new interpretation, as is a new performance of a musical score” (Dia: Beacon, Riggio Galleries).

A New York Times article written after LeWitt’s death stated, “…Mr. LeWitt gently reminded everybody that architects are called artists — good architects, anyway — even though they don’t lay their own bricks, just as composers write music that other people play but are still musical artists. Mr. LeWitt, by his methods, permitted other people to participate in the creative process, to become artists themselves.”

LeWitt offers a refreshing approach to art, especially in some of his personal writing.  In a letter to fellow artist Eva Hesse, LeWitt wrote: “Stop it and just DO.  Try and tickle something inside you, your ‘weird humor.’ You belong in the most secret part of you. Don’t worry about cool, make your own uncool… You are not responsible for the world — you are only responsible for your work, so do it. And don’t think that your work has to conform to any idea or flavor. It can be anything you want it to be.”

LeWitt started out as a graphic designer for the architect I.M. Pei, and later drew on this background to form his signature solid-colored, flat painting and drawing style.  Many of his earlier works were devoid of colors; later he switched to adding more colors and curves to his pieces in the 1980’s.  People questioned why the stark conceptualist suddenly switched, and he responded, “Why not?”

“A life in art is an unimaginable and unpredictable experience” (Sol LeWitt).

A Note to Our Readers

This blog has grown a lot since we started it in May 2011, and we wanted to thank all our readers who have kept us going!  You should “Like” us on Facebook, and take a peek at our redesigned website (we have to admit, it’s rather impressive).

We welcome your comments and feedback on our portfolio, website redesign, and blog posts.

Sincerely,

The Real Estate Arts team