Category Archives: Photography

Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter is considered one of the 21st century’s modern masters of painting.  He is talented in technical skills, as seen in his photo-realist portraits, but in his later years has worked mainly in abstraction.  Either way, his work seems to drift out of the subconscious, as his soft, blurred painting technique evokes a beautiful dreamlike quality.

Woman Descending the Staircase, 1965

Betty, 1988

Betty, 1977

One of Richter’s specialties was portraits.  The two above are of his daughter, Betty.

Richter used this type of “Atlas,” or plan, before painting.  Working straight from photographs, he would collect and place them together on sheets as source material for his paintings.

Self Portrait, 1996

Seascape, 1975

Richter also painted landscapes — clouds, seas, forests, meadows.  Unlike traditional landscape paintings, Richter’s border on the abstract.  Visually they seem to be the bridge between his photo-realist works and his more removed, abstract paintings.

Seascape, 1969

 

Untitled (Green), 1971

Abstract Painting, 1977

Untitled

In his later years, Richter — who had always worked closely with photographs — began to use them directly in his work.  Instead of painting from them, he began painting on them.  They are a collision of two forces — the real and the abstract of pure color.

Abstract Painting, 1995

Marina Abramovic: Life as Art

By Jess Wertheim, REA Intern

Is there a difference between life and art?  The famed performance artist Marina Abramović doesn’t think so.  For her, “performance becomes life itself…performance becomes life and life becomes art.”  A good friend of hers once said, “Marina is never not performing.”

Both daring and extreme, Marina Abramović pushes boundaries in the most surprising ways possible.  She risks her life on a regular basis, all in the name of art.  Everything she does provokes deep inner emotions in others as they watch and/or interact with her.  So much so that people question how what she does is art?

Her exhibit back in 2010 at the Museum of Modern Art titled The Artist Is Present was unlike anything I had ever seen before.  Upon entering the exhibit there were photographs hanging on the walls with descriptions of the performances while some projectors hung from the ceiling, playing other performances of hers in a loop.  For example, one video showed the artist lying on the ground, screaming.  The description read, “The artist screamed until she lost her voice.”  In another video, she violently brushes her hair while making frustrated, angry sounds.  In one piece called “Rest Energy”, she and her lover faced one another and held a large bow and arrow together. While she held the bow, he pulled the string backwards, aiming the arrow toward her heart.

For a piece that she did in 1973 titled “Rhythm 10” she played music from a tape recorder while one hand was spread open on the floor.  She took a knife in her other hand and to the rhythm of the music stabbed at the spaces in between her fingers and changed to a bigger knife each time she stabbed herself.  Many of her works were disturbing such as this one.

There were also two live aspects to the exhibit.  One was the naked man and woman standing in the entranceway of the gallery that led into the next gallery.  In order to proceed, it was necessary for one to pass through them, and most likely rub against them due to the small space.

The main attraction was of course, Ms. Abramović herself.  She sat at a small wooden table in the lobby of the museum across from an empty seat.  One at a time people were encouraged to take a seat across from her and sit silently without talking, touching or any explicit communication.  Her goal was “to achieve a luminous state of being and then transmit it—to engage in what she calls ‘an energy dialogue’ with the audience.” She did this all day, every day until the exhibit closed.  Appropriately called The Artist Is Present, the piece was the “longest-duration solo work of [her] career, and by far the most physically and emotionally demanding she [had] ever attempted.”  Art critic Arthur Danto observed The Artist Is Present exemplifies a completely new experience in the history of art.  “For most masterpieces people stand in front of it for thirty seconds. Mona Lisa: Thirty seconds. But people come and sit here all day.”  This performance demonstrated Ms. Abramović’s statement about long-durational work might be true after all: “Performance becomes life itself.”

Meet artist Gwyneth Leech

REA stumbled upon the artwork of Gwyneth Leech in the Flatiron building, where she creates beautiful drawings on paper coffee cups and hangs them from the ceiling.  We were so impressed and inspired by her work, that we decided to shoot a quick film and interview her for our “REA APPROVED” blog.  Check out the video here.

Photos on 9/11

REA Designer Anthony “Chip” Fernandez snapped some shots of lower Manhattan on the night of September 11, 2011.  These photos capture the two rows of lights beaming from the ground up from the World Trade Center site, piercing the Manhattan skyline and illuminating the cloudy sky.  He took them with a Canon G10 on an auto setting with no flash.  These were taken from Exchange Place in Jersey City.

Real Estate Arts designer Chip Fernandez masterfully captures a 9/11 moment

Real Estate Arts designer Chip Fernandez masterfully captures a 9/11 moment

Real Estate Arts designer Chip Fernandez brilliantly captures a 9/11 moment.

Real Estate Arts designer Chip Fernandez brilliantly captures a 9/11 moment.

Real Estate Arts Designer Anthony "Chip" Fernandez snapped some shots of lower Manhattan on the night of September 11, 2011

Real Estate Arts designer Chip Fernandez perfectly captures a 9/11 moment.